Tag Archives: cloud

rqlite 7.16.0 – restore your system from S3

rqlite is a lightweight, open-source, distributed relational database written in Go, utilizing SQLite as its storage engine.

Version 7.16.0 has been released and now includes support for restoring your rqlite system automatically from AWS S3. With this in place you can now automatically recover your system from any backup which has been previously uploaded to Cloud-based storage.

You can download the release from GitHub.

Adding automatic S3 backups to rqlite

rqlite is a lightweight, open-source, distributed relational database written in Go, utilizing SQLite as its storage engine.

Version 7.15.0 has been released and now includes support for automated backups to Amazon Web Services (AWS) S3. This enhancement offers increased data protection and expands your recovery options in case of emergencies.

You can download the release from GitHub.

Meaningful Uptime Measurements for the Cloud

Another interesting paper came my way, thanks to the Morning Paper mailing list. Nines are Not Enough:Meaningful Metrics for Clouds discusses a topic that I deal with regularly in my role at Google.

SLIs, SLOs, and SLA are easy to discuss in a general sense, but surprisingly subtle to put into practise. This paper, authored by Google engineers, explores why this is so, and offers a new framework for thinking about them.

Drop, Throttle, or Buffer

Real-time — or near real-time — data pipelines are all the rage these days.¬† I’ve built one myself, and they are becoming key components of many SaaS platforms. SaaS Analytics, Operations, and Business Intelligence systems often involve moving large amounts of data, received over the public Internet, into complex backend systems. And managing the incoming flow of data to these pipelines is key.

Continue reading Drop, Throttle, or Buffer

Come for the Features, Stay for the Uptime

I’ve been thinking¬† a lot recently about what makes computer services and products sticky — what makes users and customers come back again and again to what you’ve built. There are lots of ways to summarize it, but when it comes to systems that help technical people run their own systems, they come for the features, but they stay for the uptime.

Continue reading Come for the Features, Stay for the Uptime